Jumping genes

6/13/2016

Phys.Org (June 13) -- "Jumping genes" are ubiquitous. Every domain of life hosts these sequences of DNA that can "jump" from one position to another along a chromosome; in fact, nearly half the human genome is made up of jumping genes. Depending on their specific excision and insertion points, jumping genes can interrupt or trigger gene expression, driving genetic mutation and contributing to cell diversification. Physics professors Thomas Kuhlman and Nigel Goldenfeld at the Center for the Physics of Living Cells have observed jumping gene activity in real time within living cells. Also: Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (June 14), SciGenomics (June 14), Science Daily (June 15).

scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have observed jumping gene activity in real time within living . The study is the collaborative effort of physics professors Thomas Kuhlman and Nigel Goldenfeld, at the Center for the Physics of Living Cells

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-06-genes-action.html#jCp